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October 2020
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Syndication

Our guest on this podcast is Jacob Stegenga, the author of Care and Cure and Medical Nihilism. We discuss the effectiveness of medical interventions, the relationship between philosophers and practitioners, how to deal with complexity, the nature of sexual desire, and much more.

In this episode: 

How do doctors and other medical professionals respond to the argument for medical nihilism? (2:45) — Issues of publication bias and replication crisis: parallels between animal cognition research and medical research (7:00) — Are there examples of “gentle medicine” being used successfully in the health care system? (8:30) — How do the institutional motives and incentives for excessive intervention affect physicians’ behavior? (10:45) — How does an ordinary person know when, or when not, to trust the experts? (14:00) — Differentiating between simple and complex causes of disease (viruses & bacteria, vs. depression or schizophrenia; 17:45) — With complex conditions, could it ever be worth trying interventions that don’t seem to “make sense”? (21:00) — Current research on the philosophy of sexual desire: Is there a nature to sexual desire? What about social and cultural causes? (25:00) — Is sexual desire an individual or social phenomenon? (30:00) — Understanding the sexual desires of others through philosophy, literature and empirical science (34:15) — Current and future projects: formal logic in philosophy of science, and applications in society (37:30)

Direct download: CD_AR_Stegenga.m4a
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 2:46pm CDT

Michele Hanlon, Associate Dean for the Arts at UT Dallas, discusses how teaching and performance have moved online in spring 2020, highlighting the School of Arts & Humanities Virtual Events in the Arts.

In this episode: 

How to keep figure-drawing classes going under a shelter-in-place order (1:15) — Using Blackboard Collaborate to conduct a conditioning class in real time, as well as recording sessions for later (4:15) — Working remotely: from dance choreography to music ensembles (6:30) — Recent successful virtual events, including Mikhail Berestnev’s piano recital and a virtual tour of the Light Waves exhibition (10:30) — Advice for artists and collaborators adapting to the current situation (13:30) — Announcing the Faust radio play (14:30)

Direct download: CD_AR_Hanlon.m4a
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 2:38pm CDT

Our guest on this episode of the podcast is Nils Roemer, interim dean of the School of the Arts and Humanities, director of the Ackerman Center for Holocaust Studies, and the Stan and Barbara Rabin Professor in Holocaust Studies at The University of Texas at Dallas.

In this podcast: 

The timing of the transition to online learning (1:00) — The importance of engagement, closeness, proximity in humanities education (2:45) — Adapting to the technology of Microsoft Teams, online classes (5:15) — How to connect globally, across other borders and barriers, the importance of diversity (6:45) — After four successful searches, new tenure-track faculty coming to the School of Arts and Humanities (9:00) — Finding opportunity at moments of crisis and change (10:00) — Counteracting the compartmentalized, segregated model of knowledge (11:00) — Students are looking for some way to make different models compatible with one another; to make connections among disciplines (11:45) — Why students from Management or Computer Science are attracted to the arts and humanities (12:30) — Coffee houses as spaces of knowledge: the physician sitting next to the creative writer in Vienna (14:00) — Newest developments at the Ackerman Center: Developing an online MA in Holocaust and Human Rights Education (16:15) — Current project on Central European Jewish travel, from the 1880s to the immediate postwar period, considering the concepts of the flaneur, as well as class, nationality and ethnicity (17:45) — Upcoming project on how the Holocaust evolved dynamically after 1941 (19:00)

Direct download: CD_AR_Roemer.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 2:24pm CDT

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