Creative Disturbance (Athenaeum Review)

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Syndication

Our guest on this podcast is Jacob Stegenga, the author of Care and Cure and Medical Nihilism. We discuss the effectiveness of medical interventions, the relationship between philosophers and practitioners, how to deal with complexity, the nature of sexual desire, and much more.

In this episode: 

How do doctors and other medical professionals respond to the argument for medical nihilism? (2:45) — Issues of publication bias and replication crisis: parallels between animal cognition research and medical research (7:00) — Are there examples of “gentle medicine” being used successfully in the health care system? (8:30) — How do the institutional motives and incentives for excessive intervention affect physicians’ behavior? (10:45) — How does an ordinary person know when, or when not, to trust the experts? (14:00) — Differentiating between simple and complex causes of disease (viruses & bacteria, vs. depression or schizophrenia; 17:45) — With complex conditions, could it ever be worth trying interventions that don’t seem to “make sense”? (21:00) — Current research on the philosophy of sexual desire: Is there a nature to sexual desire? What about social and cultural causes? (25:00) — Is sexual desire an individual or social phenomenon? (30:00) — Understanding the sexual desires of others through philosophy, literature and empirical science (34:15) — Current and future projects: formal logic in philosophy of science, and applications in society (37:30)

Direct download: CD_AR_Stegenga.m4a
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 2:46pm CST

Michele Hanlon, Associate Dean for the Arts at UT Dallas, discusses how teaching and performance have moved online in spring 2020, highlighting the School of Arts & Humanities Virtual Events in the Arts.

In this episode: 

How to keep figure-drawing classes going under a shelter-in-place order (1:15) — Using Blackboard Collaborate to conduct a conditioning class in real time, as well as recording sessions for later (4:15) — Working remotely: from dance choreography to music ensembles (6:30) — Recent successful virtual events, including Mikhail Berestnev’s piano recital and a virtual tour of the Light Waves exhibition (10:30) — Advice for artists and collaborators adapting to the current situation (13:30) — Announcing the Faust radio play (14:30)

Direct download: CD_AR_Hanlon.m4a
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 2:38pm CST

Our guest on this episode of the podcast is Nils Roemer, interim dean of the School of the Arts and Humanities, director of the Ackerman Center for Holocaust Studies, and the Stan and Barbara Rabin Professor in Holocaust Studies at The University of Texas at Dallas.

In this podcast: 

The timing of the transition to online learning (1:00) — The importance of engagement, closeness, proximity in humanities education (2:45) — Adapting to the technology of Microsoft Teams, online classes (5:15) — How to connect globally, across other borders and barriers, the importance of diversity (6:45) — After four successful searches, new tenure-track faculty coming to the School of Arts and Humanities (9:00) — Finding opportunity at moments of crisis and change (10:00) — Counteracting the compartmentalized, segregated model of knowledge (11:00) — Students are looking for some way to make different models compatible with one another; to make connections among disciplines (11:45) — Why students from Management or Computer Science are attracted to the arts and humanities (12:30) — Coffee houses as spaces of knowledge: the physician sitting next to the creative writer in Vienna (14:00) — Newest developments at the Ackerman Center: Developing an online MA in Holocaust and Human Rights Education (16:15) — Current project on Central European Jewish travel, from the 1880s to the immediate postwar period, considering the concepts of the flaneur, as well as class, nationality and ethnicity (17:45) — Upcoming project on how the Holocaust evolved dynamically after 1941 (19:00)

Direct download: CD_AR_Roemer.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 2:24pm CST

Our guest on this podcast is Xiangdong Ji, project leader for the PandaX dark matter search collaboration in China's JinPing Deep-Underground Lab in Sichuan, China, and Distinguished University Professor of physics at the University of Maryland. We discuss the history of the search for dark matter, and the beauty and simplicity of physics.

Direct download: CD_AR_Ji_final.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 12:31am CST

On this episode, we talk with Justin Shubow, President of the National Civic Art Society, about modernism and classicism, the profession of architecture and its role in civil society, public monuments in Washington, D.C., the philosopher Michael Oakeshott, and much more.

 
Direct download: CD_AR_Shubow_2_final.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 10:50am CST

On this episode, we talk with Justin Shubow, President of the National Civic Art Society, about modernism and classicism, the profession of architecture and its role in civil society, public monuments in Washington, D.C., the philosopher Michael Oakeshott, and much more.

Direct download: CD_AR_Shubow_1.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 3:00am CST

Our guest today is Chris Arnade, the author of Dignity: Seeking Respect in Back Row America. He is a freelance writer and photographer whose work has appeared in the New York Times, Atlantic, Guardian, Washington Post, Financial Times, and Wall Street Journal among many others.

In this podcast:

What does “dignity” mean, and how do you recognize it when you see it? (1:30) — How the bureaucracy of “helping institutions” can have a bad effect on the people they are trying to serve (6:30) — What would be a better way for us to think about social issues in America? (11:30) — Growing up in small-town Florida, and views of the class structure in America (13:30) — What public policies do you think would help people who are struggling? (16:30) — Has writing this book changed your views on the role of religion? (20:30) — What America can learn from the virtues of El Paso and East L.A. (25:00) — Race, racism and the working class (30:00) — How do you approach the craft of photography? (33:30) — Techniques of storytelling: the influence of Roberto Bolaño’s 2666 and the feminicides in Ciudad Juárez (37:30) — Alternatives to mainstream journalism: the interviews of Nobel prize winner Svetlana Alexievich (44:00) — What are the ethics of interviewing people who are struggling? (46:00) — Has moving out of New York City affected your perspective? (48:30) — Observing American politics: Glenn Greenwald and The American Compass (51:30) –Fort Dodge, COVID at meatpacking plants , and truck stops in Missouri (55:15)

Direct download: CD_AR_Ji_Arnade_final.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 12:13am CST

Our guest on this episode is Mark Roseman, the author of Lives Reclaimed: A Story of Rescue and Resistance in Nazi Germany. We discuss the Bund, a close-knit group that worked together to save lives in Nazi Germany, the ideas of “functionary” and “perpetrator,” the Wannsee Conference, and much more.

Direct download: CD_AR_MarkRoseman_2.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 3:55pm CST

Our guest on this episode is Mark Roseman, the author of Lives Reclaimed: A Story of Rescue and Resistance in Nazi Germany. We discuss the Bund, a close-knit group that worked together to save lives in Nazi Germany, the ideas of “functionary” and “perpetrator,” the Wannsee Conference, and much more.

Direct download: CD_AR_Roseman_1.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 11:58pm CST

On the occasion of the exhibition Eddie Leon Returns: narrative work by Ray Madison (a.k.a. Linda and Ed Blackburn) at the Reading Room in Dallas, the artists and curator Caleb Bell visit the Athenaeum Review podcast to talk about painting, film noir, comics and much more.

Direct download: CD_AR_Blackburn_1.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 9:43pm CST

Jorge Lozoya, who is the founding director of the International Museum of the Baroque in Puebla, Mexico, following a distinguished career as internationalist and historian, visits the Athenaeum Review podcast to talk about Mexico, globalization, the baroque and much more.

Direct download: AR_Jorge_Part_2.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 4:08pm CST

Jorge Lozoya, who is the founding director of the International Museum of the Baroque in Puebla, Mexico, following a distinguished career as internationalist and historian, visits the Athenaeum Review podcast to talk about Mexico, globalization, the baroque and much more.

Direct download: AR_Jorge_Part_1.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 2:25pm CST

Bonnie Pitman joined The University of Dallas at Texas as Distinguished Scholar in Residence in 2012 to research and develop partnerships between UTD and cultural and health-related institutions. She serves in the Office of the Provost, and The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History, The Center for BrainHealth and the School of Arts, Technology and Emerging Communication.

As Director of Art -Brain Innovations at the UT Center for BrainHealth and the Brain Performance Center, Pitman expands her research and teaching of the power of observation, meditation, and compassion and her “Do Something New” Practice to foster brain health. These initiatives will connect neurological research with the experience and process of seeing, looking and observing and develop a framework The Power of Art™. She is collaborating and teaching with the staffs at Center for Brain Health and the Brain Performance Institute to develop these initiatives.

With the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History, Pitman directs the Art and Medicine program that focuses on the ways museums use their collections in developing close observation of works of art to enhance the diagnostic skills needed for medical practice. The Art and Medicine website at the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History includes research, resources, and courses that cultivate connections between art history and medical education. In 2016, she organized a national convening of Art Museums and Medical Schools at The Museum of Modern Art, NYC the documentation of the Forum is on the website. She teaches a course titled “The Art of Examination” using the collections of the Dallas Museum of Art for UT Southwestern Medical School students and also presents at Grand Rounds in hospitals, including UT Southwestern Medical Center, Baylor Medical Center, UT San Antonio published articles on the art and medicine programs are in the New York Times 2016, the San Antonio Medicine 2017, and Dallas Morning News, 2017. Her most recent publication is in the Journal of American Medicine, was published in January 2018, Pharma Art—Abstract Medication in the Work of Beverly Fishman.

Working with the UT Dallas School ofArts, Technology and Emerging Communication to develop new initiatives with cultural and health organizations to support the strategic plan. Prototyping innovative ways to engage audiences in the arts, sciences and healthcare using new media platforms. Partnering with the Educational Technology Services and ATEC to design and produce videos the Art of Examination, course using works of art to teach sympathy, empathy and compassion.

The former Eugene McDermott Director of The Dallas Museum of Art, she is a national leader in the public engagement of works of art. Under her leadership the Museum’s artistic excellence and engagement with the community dramatically increased. Pitman championed the transformation of the institution. She completed the Museum’s$187 million campaign to support the endowment and improve the building. Initiatives included the Center for Creative Connections, the Framework for Engaging with Art research, DMA’s Late Nights programming. The American Association of Museums recognized her lifetime contributions to the field with the Award for Distinguished Service to Museums in 2011. She served as Chair and as a member of the American Association of Museums Accreditation Commission for 12 years.

Pitman has published six books including Ignite the Power of Art: Advancing Visitor Engagement in the Museum, Excellence and Equity: Education and Public Dimension of Museums, and The Dallas Museum of Art: A Guide to the Collection.

Pitman received a Bachelor of Arts, cum laude in art historyand graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Sweet Briar College, Virginia and a Master of Arts in art history from Tulane University.

Direct download: AR_Bonnie-Pitman_2.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 4:40pm CST

Bonnie Pitman joined The University of Dallas at Texas as Distinguished Scholar in Residence in 2012 to research and develop partnerships between UTD and cultural and health-related institutions. She serves in the Office of the Provost, and The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History, The Center for BrainHealth and the School of Arts, Technology and Emerging Communication.

As Director of Art -Brain Innovations at the UT Center for BrainHealth and the Brain Performance Center, Pitman expands her research and teaching of the power of observation, meditation, and compassion and her “Do Something New” Practice to foster brain health. These initiatives will connect neurological research with the experience and process of seeing, looking and observing and develop a framework The Power of Art™. She is collaborating and teaching with the staffs at Center for Brain Health and the Brain Performance Institute to develop these initiatives.

With the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History, Pitman directs the Art and Medicine program that focuses on the ways museums use their collections in developing close observation of works of art to enhance the diagnostic skills needed for medical practice. The Art and Medicine website at the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History includes research, resources, and courses that cultivate connections between art history and medical education. In 2016, she organized a national convening of Art Museums and Medical Schools at The Museum of Modern Art, NYC the documentation of the Forum is on the website. She teaches a course titled “The Art of Examination” using the collections of the Dallas Museum of Art for UT Southwestern Medical School students and also presents at Grand Rounds in hospitals, including UT Southwestern Medical Center, Baylor Medical Center, UT San Antonio published articles on the art and medicine programs are in the New York Times 2016, the San Antonio Medicine 2017, and Dallas Morning News, 2017. Her most recent publication is in the Journal of American Medicine, was published in January 2018, Pharma Art—Abstract Medication in the Work of Beverly Fishman.

Working with the UT Dallas School ofArts, Technology and Emerging Communication to develop new initiatives with cultural and health organizations to support the strategic plan. Prototyping innovative ways to engage audiences in the arts, sciences and healthcare using new media platforms. Partnering with the Educational Technology Services and ATEC to design and produce videos the Art of Examination, course using works of art to teach sympathy, empathy and compassion.

The former Eugene McDermott Director of The Dallas Museum of Art, she is a national leader in the public engagement of works of art. Under her leadership the Museum’s artistic excellence and engagement with the community dramatically increased. Pitman championed the transformation of the institution. She completed the Museum’s$187 million campaign to support the endowment and improve the building. Initiatives included the Center for Creative Connections, the Framework for Engaging with Art research, DMA’s Late Nights programming. The American Association of Museums recognized her lifetime contributions to the field with the Award for Distinguished Service to Museums in 2011. She served as Chair and as a member of the American Association of Museums Accreditation Commission for 12 years.

Pitman has published six books including Ignite the Power of Art: Advancing Visitor Engagement in the Museum, Excellence and Equity: Education and Public Dimension of Museums, and The Dallas Museum of Art: A Guide to the Collection.

Pitman received a Bachelor of Arts, cum laude in art historyand graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Sweet Briar College, Virginia and a Master of Arts in art history from Tulane University.

Direct download: AR_Bonnie-Pitman.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 8:25pm CST

Volker M. Welter is an architectural historian whose specializes in modern architecture from the 19th century onwards. Working mainly on Californian, British, and German, but also current architecture, his research centers on domestic architecture, patronage, histories of modernist, revival styles, and sustainable architecture, and historiography of modern architecture. The subject matter of his research usually emerge from his ongoing work in archives where the unordered adjacencies of archival sources often inspire new projects. He is interested in the ways architecture intersects on a smaller scale with individual human lives and on a larger scale with the environment. His work combines detailed architectural historical analysis with biographical research and, when appropriate, philosophical, sociological and psychological (theories of spatial perception) thought contemporary to a research project’s focus.Prof. Welter has received grants and fellowships from the Getty Grant Program, the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, and the Centre Canadien d'Architecture, Montreal. Following on from Biopolis: Patrick Geddes and the City of Life (Cambridge, MA, 2002), he continues publishing on the Scotsman’s theories of the city. His book Ernst L. Freud, Architect: The Case of the Modern Bourgeois Home (Oxford, 2012) reintroduced the architect son of Sigmund Freud into the history of European architectural modernism. He is working on book on the patronage of mid-20th century domestic American architecture, compiling a history of the concept of Umwelt in relation to architecture, and researches how the battlefields of the Great War influenced the emergence of European architectural modernism in the 1920s.

To find out more about Volker M. Welter, click here

Direct download: CD_AR_Season2_Volker_3.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 2:35pm CST

Volker M. Welter is an architectural historian whose specializes in modern architecture from the 19th century onwards. Working mainly on Californian, British, and German, but also current architecture, his research centers on domestic architecture, patronage, histories of modernist, revival styles, and sustainable architecture, and historiography of modern architecture. The subject matter of his research usually emerge from his ongoing work in archives where the unordered adjacencies of archival sources often inspire new projects. He is interested in the ways architecture intersects on a smaller scale with individual human lives and on a larger scale with the environment. His work combines detailed architectural historical analysis with biographical research and, when appropriate, philosophical, sociological and psychological (theories of spatial perception) thought contemporary to a research project’s focus.Prof. Welter has received grants and fellowships from the Getty Grant Program, the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, and the Centre Canadien d'Architecture, Montreal. Following on from Biopolis: Patrick Geddes and the City of Life (Cambridge, MA, 2002), he continues publishing on the Scotsman’s theories of the city. His book Ernst L. Freud, Architect: The Case of the Modern Bourgeois Home (Oxford, 2012) reintroduced the architect son of Sigmund Freud into the history of European architectural modernism. He is working on book on the patronage of mid-20th century domestic American architecture, compiling a history of the concept of Umwelt in relation to architecture, and researches how the battlefields of the Great War influenced the emergence of European architectural modernism in the 1920s.

 

To find out more about Volker M. Welter, click here

Direct download: CD_AR_Season2_Volker_2.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 12:19am CST

Volker M. Welter is an architectural historian whose specializes in modern architecture from the 19th century onwards. Working mainly on Californian, British, and German, but also current architecture, his research centers on domestic architecture, patronage, histories of modernist, revival styles, and sustainable architecture, and historiography of modern architecture. The subject matter of his research usually emerge from his ongoing work in archives where the unordered adjacencies of archival sources often inspire new projects. He is interested in the ways architecture intersects on a smaller scale with individual human lives and on a larger scale with the environment. His work combines detailed architectural historical analysis with biographical research and, when appropriate, philosophical, sociological and psychological (theories of spatial perception) thought contemporary to a research project’s focus.Prof. Welter has received grants and fellowships from the Getty Grant Program, the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, and the Centre Canadien d'Architecture, Montreal. Following on from Biopolis: Patrick Geddes and the City of Life (Cambridge, MA, 2002), he continues publishing on the Scotsman’s theories of the city. His book Ernst L. Freud, Architect: The Case of the Modern Bourgeois Home (Oxford, 2012) reintroduced the architect son of Sigmund Freud into the history of European architectural modernism. He is working on book on the patronage of mid-20th century domestic American architecture, compiling a history of the concept of Umwelt in relation to architecture, and researches how the battlefields of the Great War influenced the emergence of European architectural modernism in the 1920s.

To find out more about Volker M. Welter, click here

Direct download: CD_AR_Season2_Volker.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 11:27pm CST

Dr. Safiya Umoja Noble is an associate professor at the University of California, Los Angeles in the departments of information studies and African American studies. She also is a visiting faculty member at the University of Southern California’s Annenberg School of Communication. Noble’s academic research focuses on the design of digital media platforms on the internet and their impact on society. Her work is both sociological and interdisciplinary, marking the ways that digital media impacts and intersects with issues of race, gender, culture, and technology. She is regularly quoted for her expertise by national and international press on issues of algorithmic discrimination and technology bias. Noble is the co-editor of two edited volumes: The Intersectional Internet: Race, Sex, Culture and Class Online and Emotions, Technology & Design. She currently serves as an associate editor for the Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies , and is the co-editor of the Commentary & Criticism section of the Journal of Feminist Media Studies . Noble earned her doctoral and master’s degrees in library and information science from the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, and a bachelor’s degree in sociology from California State University, Fresno.

Click here to learn more about Safiya Umoja Noble

Direct download: CD_AR_Season2_SafiyaNoble.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 6:34pm CST

Don Howard is the former director and a Fellow of the University of Notre Dame’s Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values, where he now functions as co-director of the center’s ethics of emerging technologies focus area. He holds a permanent appointment as a Professor in the Department of Philosophy. With a first degree in physics (B.Sc., Lyman Briggs College, Michigan State University, 1971), Howard went on to obtain both an M.A. (1973) and a Ph.D. (1979) in philosophy from Boston University, where he specialized in philosophy of physics under the direction of Abner Shimony. Howard has been writing and teaching about the ethics of science and technology for many years. Co-editor of the collection, The Challenge of the Social and the Pressure of Practice: Science and Values Revisited (University of Pittsburgh Press), Howard has led NSF-funded workshops on science and ethics at Notre Dame for physics REU students, is currently the lead PI on an NSF-EESE research ethics grant, and has taught courses on topics ranging from the moral choices of atomic scientists during World War II and the Cold War, to the ethics of emerging weapons technologies and robot ethics. He has also served as the Secretary of the International Society for Military Ethics. Among his current research interests are ethical and legal issues in cyberconflict and cybersecurity as well as the ethics of autonomous systems. His paper, ‘‘Virtue in Cyberconflict,’’ was published in 2014 in the volume, Ethics of Information Warfare (Springer), and his essay on ‘‘Civic Virtue and Cybersecurity’’ was published in 2017 in thevolume, The Nature of Peace and the Morality of Armed Conflict (Palgrave Macmillan). His editorials on technology ethics have appeared in the Wall Street Journal, on CNN, at InsideSources, NBC Think, and in other venues.

Click here to learn more about Don Howard

Direct download: CD_AR_Season2_DonHoward.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 2:35am CST

Casey Fiesler is a social computing researcher who primarily studies governance in online communities, technology ethics, and fandom. She is a Senior Fellow in the Silicon Flatirons Institute for Law, Technology, and Entrepreneurship, an ATLAS fellow, and holds a courtesy appointment in Computer Science. Also a public scholar, she is a frequent commentator and speaker on topics of technology ethics and policy, as well as women in STEM (including consulting with Mattel on their computing-related Barbies). Her work is supported in part by a $3 million collaborative National Science Foundation grant focused on empirical studies of research ethics. Fiesler holds a PhD from Georgia Tech in Human-Centered Computing and a JD from Vanderbilt University Law School.

Click here to learn more about Casey Fiesler

Direct download: CD_AR_Season2_Fiesler.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 1:08am CST

Frederick Turner is a poet, a cultural critic, a playwright, a philosopher of science, an interdisciplinary scholar, an aesthetician, an essayist and a translator. He is the author of 28 books, including Natural Classicism: Essays on Literature and Science; Genesis: an Epic Poem; and Rebirth of Value: Meditations on Beauty, Ecology, Religion and Education. His plays Height and The Prayers of Dallas have been performed in various locations.

His contributions as an interdisciplinary scholar have been recognized, cited, or published in many fields such as literary and critical theory, comparative literature, anthropology, psychology, neuroscience, sociobiology, political philosophy, chaos theory, theology, the history and philosophy of science and technology, translation theory and art history. He is or has been a member of several research groups on subjects including the biological foundations of esthetics, artificial intelligence, ecological restoration, law and systems research, time, the sociological studyof emotion, chaos theory, and ecopoetics.

He is a winner of the Milan Fust Prize (Hungary’s highest literary honor), the Levinson Poetry Prize (awarded by Poetry), the PEN Dallas Chapter Golden Pen Award, the Missouri Review essay prize, the David RobertPoetry prize, the Gjenima Prize, and several other literary, artistic and academic honors. He has participated in literary and TV projects that have won a Benjamin Franklin Book Award and an Emmy, respectively. He is a fellow of the Texas Institute of Letters, and was nominated for the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2004 and every year following 2006.Turner earned his undergraduate and graduate degrees from Oxford University. He is also a second degree black belt in karate.

To learn more, click here

Direct download: CD_AR_Season2_Turner_2.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 3:24am CST

Frederick Turner is a poet, a cultural critic, a playwright, a philosopher of science, an interdisciplinary scholar, an aesthetician, an essayist and a translator. He is the author of 28 books, including Natural Classicism: Essays on Literature and Science; Genesis: an Epic Poem; and Rebirth of Value: Meditations on Beauty, Ecology, Religion and Education. His plays Height and The Prayers of Dallas have been performed in various locations.

His contributions as an interdisciplinary scholar have been recognized, cited, or published in many fields such as literary and critical theory, comparative literature, anthropology, psychology, neuroscience, sociobiology, political philosophy, chaos theory, theology, the history and philosophy of science and technology, translation theory and art history. He is or has been a member of several research groups on subjects including the biological foundations of esthetics, artificial intelligence, ecological restoration, law and systems research, time, the sociological studyof emotion, chaos theory, and ecopoetics.

He is a winner of the Milan Fust Prize (Hungary’s highest literary honor), the Levinson Poetry Prize (awarded by Poetry), the PEN Dallas Chapter Golden Pen Award, the Missouri Review essay prize, the David RobertPoetry prize, the Gjenima Prize, and several other literary, artistic and academic honors. He has participated in literary and TV projects that have won a Benjamin Franklin Book Award and an Emmy, respectively. He is a fellow of the Texas Institute of Letters, and was nominated for the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2004 and every year following 2006.Turner earned his undergraduate and graduate degrees from Oxford University. He is also a second degree black belt in karate.

To learn more, click here

Direct download: CD_AR_Season2_Turner.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 10:55pm CST

Zsuzsanna Ozsváth is Director of the Holocaust Studies Program at UT Dallas. She has published a number of articles, dealing with aesthetic and ethical issues in French, German, and Hungarian literature as well as with the relationship between art and totalitarian ideology. Since the eighties, she has undertaken several translation projects and worked on various branches of Holocaust Studies.

Click here to learn more about Zsuzsanna Ozsváth 

Direct download: AR_Season2__ZsuzsannaOzsvth__2.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 4:03am CST

Zsuzsanna Ozsváth is Director of the Holocaust Studies Program at UT Dallas. She has published a number of articles, dealing with aesthetic and ethical issues in French, German, and Hungarian literature as well as with the relationship between art and totalitarian ideology. Since the eighties, she has undertaken several translation projects and worked on various branches of Holocaust Studies.

Click here to learn more about Zsuzsanna Ozsváth 

Direct download: AR_Season2__ZsuzsannaOzsvth_.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 1:34am CST

Catherine Craft is Curator at the Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas and a scholar of Dada, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, and Neo-Dada. She is curator of the recent exhibition The Nature of Arp, the first North American museum survey of the artist Jean (Hans) Arp in three decades; she will also oversee that exhibition’s installation at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice, where it will open April 2019. Dr. Craft curated the Nasher’s 2015 touring retrospective Melvin Edwards: Five Decadesand, as with The Nature of Arp, was principal author of the accompanying publication. She was also a contributing author for Nasher exhibition catalogues on the artists Ann Veronica Janssens and Katharina Grosse; on Isamu Noguchi for Return to Earth: Ceramic Sculpture of Fontana, Melotti, Miró, Noguchi, and Picasso, 1943-1963; and Lara Almarcegui, Rachel Harrison, and Liz Larner for Nasher XChange: 10 Years. 10 Artists. 10 Sites. In 2017 she curated the group exhibition Paper into Sculpture, which examined contemporary artists who use paper as a sculptural material, and she has also worked on research and presentation of works from the Nasher’s permanent collection.

Dr. Craft holds a B.A. in art history from Texas Christian University and an M.A. from the University of Virginia. She worked in the Department of Modern and Contemporary Art at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., where she worked on Robert Rauschenberg and Ellsworth Kelly exhibitions, before receiving her doctoral degree in art history from the University of Texas at Austin. She is the author of An Audience of Artists: Dada, Neo-Dada, and the Emergence of Abstract Expressionism(University of Chicago, 2012) and Robert Rauschenberg(Phaidon, 2013), as well numerous articles and reviews. She has presented talks at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C.; and Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven. As a senior research fellow at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, she conceived and co-curated the 2011 exhibition Paper Trails: Selected Works from the Permanent Collection 1934-2001. She joined the Nasher Sculpture Center in 2011.

Direct download: AR_Season2_Craft_2.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 11:42pm CST

Catherine Craft is Curator at the Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas and a scholar of Dada, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, and Neo-Dada. She is curator of the recent exhibition The Nature of Arp, the first North American museum survey of the artist Jean (Hans) Arp in three decades; she will also oversee that exhibition’s installation at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice, where it will open April 2019. Dr. Craft curated the Nasher’s 2015 touring retrospective Melvin Edwards: Five Decadesand, as with The Nature of Arp, was principal author of the accompanying publication. She was also a contributing author for Nasher exhibition catalogues on the artists Ann Veronica Janssens and Katharina Grosse; on Isamu Noguchi for Return to Earth: Ceramic Sculpture of Fontana, Melotti, Miró, Noguchi, and Picasso, 1943-1963; and Lara Almarcegui, Rachel Harrison, and Liz Larner for Nasher XChange: 10 Years. 10 Artists. 10 Sites. In 2017 she curated the group exhibition Paper into Sculpture, which examined contemporary artists who use paper as a sculptural material, and she has also worked on research and presentation of works from the Nasher’s permanent collection.

Dr. Craft holds a B.A. in art history from Texas Christian University and an M.A. from the University of Virginia. She worked in the Department of Modern and Contemporary Art at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., where she worked on Robert Rauschenberg and Ellsworth Kelly exhibitions, before receiving her doctoral degree in art history from the University of Texas at Austin. She is the author of An Audience of Artists: Dada, Neo-Dada, and the Emergence of Abstract Expressionism(University of Chicago, 2012) and Robert Rauschenberg(Phaidon, 2013), as well numerous articles and reviews. She has presented talks at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C.; and Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven. As a senior research fellow at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, she conceived and co-curated the 2011 exhibition Paper Trails: Selected Works from the Permanent Collection 1934-2001. She joined the Nasher Sculpture Center in 2011.

Direct download: AR_Season2_Craft.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 12:37am CST

Ittai Weinryb is Associate Professor of Art History at Bard Graduate Center in New York. He received his PhD (2010) and MA from the Johns Hopkins University and his BA from Tel Aviv University. His area of research and teaching include Art and Material Culture of Western Europe and the Medieval Mediterranean in the nexus of Image and Object Theory, Anthropology, Magic and Religion as well as Medieval Folklore. He has recently curated an exhibition entitled Agents of Faith: Votive Objects in Time and Place, exploring votiveofferings in the context of material culture, art history, and religious studies to better understand their history and present-day importance.” His awards and fellowships include the Adolf Katzenellenbogen Prize, Robert and Nancy Hall Fellow, the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore; Max Planck Doctoral Fellow at the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florence; ICMA/Kress Research Award. Andrew Mellon Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. In the Academic year 2014-15 He was a fellow at the Art Histories and Aesthetic Practices project, and the Forum für Transregionale Studien, Berlin.

Click here to learn more about Ittai Weinryb

Direct download: CD_AR_Season2_Weinryb.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 8:30pm CST

Linda Henderson earned her PhD at Yale University and has taught 20th-century European and American art in the Department of Art and Art History since 1978. Before coming to the University of Texas, she served from 1974 through 1977 as Curator of Modern Art at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Professor Henderson’s research and teaching focus on the interdisciplinary study of modernism, including the relation of modern art to geometry, science and technology, and mystical and occult philosophies. In addition to periodical articles and catalog essays, she is the author of The Fourth Dimension and Non-Euclidean Geometry in Modern Art(Princeton University Press, 1983; new ed., MIT Press, 2013) and Duchamp in Context: Science and Technology in the Large Glass and Related Works(Princeton, 1998), which won first prize in the Robert W. Hamilton Author Awards competition in 1999.

To learn more about Lina Henderson, Click Here

Direct download: AR_Linda_Final.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 5:14pm CST

Ludwig Schwarz earned a BFA from Southern Methodist University and an MFA from the School of the Visual Arts, NY. Solo exhibitions include “Some 20 year old works on Paper and 2 New Sculptures”, curated by Charles Dee Mitchell, The Box Company, Dallas, TX (2017); “Rest Stop”, Peter Makebish Gallery, NYC (2015); “Retrospective (1990-2014)”, Oliver Francis Gallery, Dallas (2014); “Meet the Schwarzes,”(with Marjorie Schwarz), Nada Art Fair, NYC (2013); “The Four Seasons (Season Premier)”, Sunday LES, NYC (2008); “Untitled (Travelogue 8)”, Freight and Volume, NYC (2005); as well as exhibitions at Angstrom Gallery and Road Agent, Dallas and Lump, Raleigh, NC. Group exhibitions include Brucennial 2012 and 2010, NYC; Leo Castelli, NYC; Gavin Brown, NYC; Inman Gallery, Houston; The Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University, MA; Texas Prize at Art House, Austin, and Art Museum of Southeast Texas, Beaumont.

Direct download: CD_AR_Season2_Ludwig.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 4:28am CST

Since arriving at Boston University in 2005, Gregory Williams has delivered lectures and participated in numerous conferences in Europe and the United States. An editor-at-large of Brooklyn’s Cabinet magazine, he has published art criticism in periodicals, including Artforum, frieze and Texte zur Kunst. He has written catalogue essays for exhibitions of Rosemarie Trockel (Museum Ludwig in Cologne, Kunstmuseum Basel and WIELS in Brussels) and Martin Kippenberger (Tate Modern in London), and has authored book chapters for The Black Sphinx: On the Comedic in Modern Art, John C. Welchman, ed. (Zurich: JRP/Ringier, 2010) and Regarding the Popular: High and Low Culture in the Avant-Garde and Modernism, Sascha Bru, et al., ed. (Berlin and New York: Walther de Gruyter, 2011). Most recently, his essay, “Ground Control: Painting in the Work of Cosima von Bonin,” appeared in the Winter 2012 issue of Art Journal. His book, Permission to Laugh: Humor and Politics in Contemporary German Art, was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2012.

Please visit here to find out more about Gregory Williams

Direct download: CD_AR_Season2_Williams_2.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 8:51pm CST

Since arriving at Boston University in 2005, Gregory Williams has delivered lectures and participated in numerous conferences in Europe and the United States. An editor-at-large of Brooklyn’s Cabinet magazine, he has published art criticism in periodicals, including Artforum, frieze and Texte zur Kunst. He has written catalogue essays for exhibitions of Rosemarie Trockel (Museum Ludwig in Cologne, Kunstmuseum Basel and WIELS in Brussels) and Martin Kippenberger (Tate Modern in London), and has authored book chapters for The Black Sphinx: On the Comedic in Modern Art, John C. Welchman, ed. (Zurich: JRP/Ringier, 2010) and Regarding the Popular: High and Low Culture in the Avant-Garde and Modernism, Sascha Bru, et al., ed. (Berlin and New York: Walther de Gruyter, 2011). Most recently, his essay, “Ground Control: Painting in the Work of Cosima von Bonin,” appeared in the Winter 2012 issue of Art Journal. His book, Permission to Laugh: Humor and Politics in Contemporary German Art, was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2012.

Please visit here to find out more about Gregory Williams

Direct download: CD_AR_Season2_EP3_1.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 10:15pm CST

Hansong dan is Associate Professor of English at the School of Foreign Studies, Nanjing University. His research interests include modern/contemporary American novels, 9/11 literature, posthumanism and Digital Humanities. He has authored numerous articles in nationally renowned journals, such asForeign Literature Review. His articles in English can be found in volumes published by Northwestern University Press and the Royal Swedish Academy of Letters, History and Antiquities. His book, To Realize the Universal: Allegorical Narrative in Thornton Wilder’s Plays and Novels, was published by Peter Lang in 2012. He has translated some works by Thomas Pynchon, Julian Barnes, and Thornton Wilder.

Direct download: CD_AR_Season2_EP2_2.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 6:31pm CST

Hansong dan is Associate Professor of English at the School of Foreign Studies, Nanjing University. His research interests include modern/contemporary American novels, 9/11 literature, posthumanism and Digital Humanities. He has authored numerous articles in nationally renowned journals, such asForeign Literature Review. His articles in English can be found in volumes published by Northwestern University Press and the Royal Swedish Academy of Letters, History and Antiquities. His book, To Realize the Universal: Allegorical Narrative in Thornton Wilder’s Plays and Novels, was published by Peter Lang in 2012. He has translated some works by Thomas Pynchon, Julian Barnes, and Thornton Wilder.

Direct download: CD_AR_Season2_EP2.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 8:44pm CST

Join Ben Lima for a conversation on the topics of imperial and modern China with Michael Szonyi. Click here to learn more about Michael Szonyi 

Recorded and Edited by Andrew Oh

Direct download: CD_AR_Season2_Ep1.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 12:57am CST

Join Ben Lima for a conversation on the topics of morality and philosophy with Mark Johnson, author and Knight Professor of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

Direct download: AR_Mark_Johnson.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 9:32pm CST

Photography historian Abigail Solomon-Godeau speaks on a wide range of topics, from the psychology of power and desire as the two relate to photography, to consent in present-day street photography, to the use of photography as propaganda. 

Direct download: AR_Abigail_Solomon_Godeau.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 9:01pm CST

Join Ben Lima for a conversation with Stephen Asma, a Professor of Philosophy at Columbia College Chicago, where he is also Senior Fellow of the Research Group in Mind, Science and Culture. Asma is the author of ten books, including The Evolution of Imagination (University of Chicago Press, 2017), The Evolution of Mind: Affective Roots of Culture and Cognition with Rami Gabriel (Harvard University Press, forthcoming), On Monsters: an Unnatural History of Our Worst Fears (Oxford University Press), and The Gods Drink Whiskey (HarperOne).

Recorded and edited by Oskar Olsson

Direct download: AR_Stephen_Asma_Pt_2.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 6:15pm CST

Join Ben Lima for a conversation with Sandra Russ, a distinguished University Professor and Louis D. Beaumont University Professor at Case Western Reserve University. Her research has focused on understanding how pretend play is involved in child development and in child psychotherapy. She is the author of Pretend Play in Childhood: The Foundation of Adult Creativity (2013), American Psychological Association.

Edited by Andrew Oh

Direct download: CD_AR_SandraRuss_1.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 1:23am CST

Direct download: CD_AR_StephenAsma.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 4:43pm CST

Join Ben Lima for a conversation with Thomas Gaehtgens, director of the Getty Research Institute. The two discuss European art history and traditions of museum curation, as well as Museumsinsel, the northern half of one of Berlin's districts which is made up of five architecturally grand museums. Spoken of in Specific detail is the Bode Museum. 

Edited by Oskar Olsson. 

Direct download: AR_Thomas_Gaehtgens.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 1:11am CST

Join Ben Lima for a conversation with filmmaker Sandra Luz-Lopez Barroso. The two discuss Barroso’s film Artemio (2017), migration and the Costa Chica of Oaxaca and Guerrero.

Recorded and edited by Oskar Olsson.

Direct download: AR_Sandra_Luz-Lopez_Barroso_Pt_2.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 6:32pm CST

Join Ben Lima for a conversation with filmmaker Sandra Luz-Lopez Barroso. The two discuss Barroso's film Artemio (2017), migration and the Costa Chica of Oaxaca and Guerrero. 

Direct download: AR_Sandra_Luz-Lopez_Barroso_Pt_1.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 9:34pm CST

Join Ben Lima for a conversation with Martin Powers, Sally Michelson Davidson Professor of Chinese Arts and Cultures at the university of Michigan, as the two discuss how Chinese art and culture have influenced Western ideals of meritocracy, individualism and good government.

 

Direct download: AR_Martin_Powers_Part_2.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 8:49pm CST

Join Ben Lima for a conversation with Martin Powers, Sally Michelson Davidson Professor of Chinese Arts and Cultures at the university of Michigan, as the two discuss how Chinese art and culture have influenced Western ideals of meritocracy, individualism and good government. 

Direct download: AR_Martin_Powers_Part_1.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 6:19pm CST

Direct download: AR_Daou.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 2:45am CST

Direct download: AR_Michael_Lobel_Part_2.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 3:15pm CST

Join Ben Lima for a conversation with art historian Michael Lobel, author of numerous books on the subjects of pop and postwar art. The two discuss realism, pop art, and how the culture of commercial art has changed over the years. 

Recorded and edited by Oskar Olsson. 

Direct download: AR_Michael_Lobel.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 5:41pm CST

Direct download: AR_Vlad.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 11:38pm CST

Suzanne Preston Blier, President of the College Art Foundation and author of numerous works on Art History, joins Ben Lima for a conversation on the ideas of risk, power and identity in African art and culture. 

Direct download: AR_Suzanne_Blier.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 11:53pm CST

Ben Lima speaks with Yve-Alain Bois on the topics of modernist painting, art history, and his current work. 

Recorded and edited by Oskar Olsson. 

Direct download: Yve_Mastered.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 7:07pm CST

A continuation of Ben's conversation with John Mraz on photography in Mexico.

The music used for the intro and outro bumpers is Cello Suite no. 1 in G, BMW 1007, composed by Johann Sebastian Bach.

Recorded and edited by Oskar Olsson.

Direct download: Episode_1_Part_2_John_Mraz.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 1:42am CST

A conversation with John Mraz about photography in Mexico.

The music used for the intro and outro bumpers is 

Cell Suite no. 1 in G, BMW 1007, composed by Johann Sebastian Bach. 

Find the full piece here.  

Recorded and edited by Oskar Olsson.

 

Direct download: Episode_1_Part_1_John_Mraz.mp3
Category:Athenaeum Review -- posted at: 7:21pm CST

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